Photo update 3: My first, but definitely not the last, time to Kuala Terengganu

This time around, we’re happy to feature an extra-special update for you…one of our newest volunteers, Miss Chan Xiu Li, made a trip aaall the way from Singapore to visit the Rimba research station in Kampung Basung, Terengganu. She’s documented her experience and impressions in the form of a photo-essay. We thought Xiu Li’s photos were so compelling, they had to be put up on our website! Read on to find out about Xiu Li’s volunteer experience!

(All photos copyrighted to Chan Xiu Li. Words on the photos are quotes taken from Alphabeat’s ‘Into The Jungle’).

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Publication update 5: Asian tapirs are no elephants…

Captive tapir

…especially when it comes to seed dispersal. Back in March, we highlighted two publications by Ahimsa which look at the role megafauna such as elephants play in shaping our forests. This time, Ahimsa’s looking at a slightly smaller – though still large – herbivore: the Asian Tapir. We’ve already mentioned before how Reuben and Sheema have been involved in a tapir population study. Ahimsa, on the other hand, has been specifically investigating tapir diet and feeding behaviour to find out if they play a role similar to that of elephants. After all, studies in South and Central America have suggested that New World tapirs might be important seed dispersers over there. But, that’s in a world where there are no elephants. So the question Ahimsa is asking is: If elephants disappear, could tapirs step in to fill their big shoes? Continue reading

Project update 2: Kudos to Wildlife Department for nabbing pangolin hunters

Rimba would like to give a special shout-out to the Terengganu State Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP or its Malay acronym PERHILITAN) for conducting a successful raid that netted Vietnamese and Cambodian poachers plundering Tembat Forest Reserve, one of the research sites in the Kenyir Wildlife Corridor Project. The poachers were caught red-handed with pangolin meat and scales.

DWNP trailed the poachers for 70 km from Sungai Ketiar Elephant Sanctuary, after the poachers were initially spotted leaving the forest reserve by car. The fact that these foreigners were able to easily access the forest using a vehicle is yet another example of how roads can facilitate entry for illegal hunting and collection of forest produce.

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