Project update 19, photo update 11, video update 6: Project Pteropus phase 1 in review

sheema_esteban_tekek

It’s definitely been a crazy, roller coaster ride for Project Pteropus so far! Time flies when you’re having fun, and before we knew it, we’re already in the third and final year of Sheema‘s PhD. We’re due to start a¬†tiny bit more of fieldwork over the next 3 months, then everything needs to be wrapped up pronto as she’ll be on her way to spend 6 months in Paris this June ūüôā

So what has the project achieved so far? Some pretty exciting stuff, as it turns out. Almost all the data are in already, but some still need a bit of time to be analysed.¬†We’ve decided to summarise our results so far into an interim report, which is why you’re getting this bumper post that serves as a compilation of updates, photos AND videos all at the same time! ūüėÄ

Also, HUGE thanks to Bat Conservation International for awarding us a small grant in September last year. Without this funding we definitely wouldn’t have been able to achieve as much as we have, and we’re deeply grateful. Click on the BCI logo below to find out more about¬†applying for their small grants:

BCI logo

Meanwhile, here’s what we’ve found out up to this point (if you’re just interested in the images and don’t need to read through the information, just scroll down further!): Continue reading

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Photo update 10: Camera traps and durian trees

Wow, and just like that, we’re already halfway into Year 2 of Project Pteropus! We’ve been quite busy on Tioman, what with faecal sampling and phenology monitoring now taking place on both east and west sides of the island. We also have some very good news to share: the project will be able to keep going for the rest of the year, as the Rufford¬†Foundation¬†have awarded us a small grant – which we are enormously grateful for!

Rufford logo

Meanwhile, it’s high time for another photo update. Back in late April and early May, we¬†put some Reconyx¬†camera traps¬†and Bushnell video traps up in some flowering durian (Durio zibethinus) trees. This will help us study the durian’s pollination ecology better – what animals visit to feed on the flowers, and how each species in this complex network plays a role, and interacts with the others, to influence pollination success and fruit development. It’s also a start in answering the question of whether flying foxes help to pollinate durian trees. This is an extremely complicated bit of research, and we wouldn’t have been able to do it without Dr. Sara Bumrungsri and his PhD student, Tuanjit Sritongchuay¬†(Dr. Bumrungsri’s¬†study¬†discovered that the nectarivorous bat Eonycteris spelaea¬†is a principal pollinator of durian in southern Thailand). They kindly entertained all of Sheema’s questions and requests, and were extremely generous hosts when Sheema visited their lab at Prince of Songkla University – where they taught her more about durian ecology and pollination studies.

Mak Long Hapsah and Pak Long Awang from Kampung Juara have generously allowed us to use their durian orchard for our study. As their trees are already quite old and tall – ranging between 15-25 metres high, we couldn’t climb them ourselves. So we enlisted the services of Saifful Pathil and Muhammad Nur Hafizi Abu Yazid (‘Fizie’ for short!), from Tree Climbers Malaysia. They are professional tree-climbers who are extremely well-trained in safe and effective climbing techniques, using high-quality climbing and safety equipment. So we knew right away that we were in good hands.

We were also joined by Kim McConkey and her sons Sanjay and Ryan, who not only helped us out but were also loads of fun to have around!

So for those of you who have never seen a durian tree, or maybe don’t know what durian flowers look like, or have no idea¬†what professional tree-climbing is all about…here’s a little photo-journal documenting our work in the durian orchard! Also, follow the post all the way down for a little sneak peek of who’s been visiting the durian trees in the night… Continue reading

Video update 2: Empty nest syndrome

It’s happened!

The baby hornbills have finally grown up enough to leave home. That didn’t take long!

Anuar wrote to us yesterday with the following exciting update:

“The last few days of activity began with the opening of the front nest¬†sealing, sometime between 4 and 5:30pm, May 24. The female exited the¬†nest at 5:40pm and left the area. The two young birds remained inside.¬†Food was still brought by the male, but less of it and less¬†frequently. The male often presented food, but would not pass it to¬†the birds inside. The male brought clumps of dirt that were passed to¬†the nest, the birds inside breaking up the dirt and letting it drop at¬†the front of the nest.

The first young bird to leave the nest did so around 6pm, May 24. This was not captured, but video prior to this time shows two active young, and all video after this time shows only 1 young inside. The second young bird left at 9:01am May 27, and remained near the nesting jar for 6 minutes before wandering off to the left.

The male visited the nest 3 hours after that with food, only to find¬†an empty nest.”

Awww! We feel very fortunate indeed to have caught this occurrence on video. It’s an unbelievably wondrous spectacle – great job Anuar! Check out the video he sent us: Continue reading